Alan B. Shepard Astronaut On the Surface of the Moon NASA 1971 hasselblad39s history in space gear patrol Surface On the Shepard B. Alan the of Moon 1971 Astronaut NASA

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Interesting facts about space.

Though a moon day is equivalent to 28 earth days, surprisingly, the biological day cycle of the moon people is 24 earth hours. This shows that their biological clock has nothing to do with the sun rise and sun set in the moon. Perhaps the 24 hour period of time may be a unique biological 'interval of renewal' that nature has given to all human species. Usually moon people sleep about eight hours a day at "any time of convenience" and remain active during most of the remaining hours. The "time of convenience" varies for each individual. As a result of not having a particular day or night time, there are always people awake and active all of the time. Therefore, all community based activities take place all the time and continuously without stoppage. There are no holiday systems practiced in the moon. Every day is a working day and every hour is an active hour. Every hour is also a sleeping hour to whoever desires to consider it that way.



and here is another

Multiple Light Sources. On the moon, there is only one light source sufficiently strong to form shadows; the Sun. So it is solid to suggest that all shadows on the Moon should run parallel to each other. However, this was apparently not the case during the moon landing.



and finally

Saturn, along with its frozen retinue of icy rings, dazzling moons, and sparkling moonlets, orbits our Sun about ten times farther out than the Earth. Astronomers received their first collection of detailed data about Titan when the Cassini/Huygens orbiter and lander arrived there in 2004. The Huygens lander successfully obtained revealing images when it drifted down to Titan's tormented, hydrocarbon-slashed surface, as well as when it was still floating slowly and softly down through the moon's thick, foggy, orange atmosphere--which has 1.4 times greater pressure than that of our own planet. These pictures, when combined with other studies using instruments aboard the Cassini orbiter, reveal to curious planetary scientists that Titan's geological features include lakes and river channels filled with methane, ethane, and propane. Titan's strange surface also shows mountains and sand dunes--and it is pockmarked by craters. The rippling dunes form when fierce winds sweep up loose particles from the surface and then tosses them downwind. However, the sands of Titan are not like the sands on our Earth. Titan's "sand" is both bizarre and alien, probably composed of very small particles of solid hydrocarbons--or, possibly, ice imprisoned within hydrocarbons--with a density of about one-third that of the sand on our own planet. Furthermore, Titan's gravity is low. In fact, it is only approximately one-seventh that of Earth. This means that, working in combination with the low density of Titan's sand particles, they carry only the small weight of a mere four percent that of terrestrial sand. Titan's "sand" is about the same light-weight as freeze-dried grains of coffee!

Other facts:

Methane and nitrogen present in Titan's atmosphere react together to create a variety of organic materials. Many planetary scientists think the heaviest materials somersault down to the surface of hydrocarbon-slashed Titan. Dr. Le Gall and her team propose that when those compounds splash into the sea, either by directly falling from the air as hydrocarbon rain, or through Titan's rivers, some are dissolved in the liquid methane. The compounds that do not dissolve, such as nitrites and benzene, sink down into the floor of this exotic sea.



Mars may be circled by many moons smaller than 160 to 330 feet in diameter, and a ring of dust has been predicted to circle Mars between Phobos and Deimos.



Most of Saturn's natural satellites are very small and icy dancing moonlets. However, the larger, icy midsized moons twirl around their enormous ringed planet in a lovely and mysterious dance. The largest of the icy moons is Rhea, Saturn's second-largest moon after the weird world that is Titan. Iapetus, the third largest of Saturn's moons, is two-faced, with one side composed of gleaming, very bright, highly reflective ice, and the other, dark and non-reflective, a blackened splotch staining the pristine white ice. Iapetus is larger than Mimas and Enceladus. There is an enormous impact crater on the moon Mimas, that stands out as a prominent feature on what is apparently a badly bombarded, heavily cratered world. The large impact crater Herschel on this 400-kilometer moon was excavated by a tumbling chunk of space-stuff made of rock, ice, or both, that came very close to powdering the entire little moon. Another icy moon, Enceladus, is a bewitching world, 500-kilometers in diameter, that is thought to harbor a global subsurface ocean beneath its frozen crust. Where there is liquid water there is always the possibility--though, by no means, the promise--of life. Enceladus also has the highest albedo of any other moon in our Solar System. This means that it has the most dazzlingly bright reflective surface. It also possesses a very active geology, rendering it almost free of craters because it is constantly being resurfaced by the emissions of gushing icy geysers that are responsible for fresh snow that keeps the surface of the little moon sparkling and smooth.