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Interesting facts about space.

The temperatures around the equatorial and mid latitude surface at daytime and in the night are around 225oF and minus 298oF respectively. As the moon day is approximately 28 earth days, heating and cooling of the moon's surfaces affects the inside cave temperature significantly. The temperature difference in the opposite side of the moon makes the air in the cave move from one area to the other creating complex wind movements. When high speed wind flows across the vertical rock structures, it makes gurgling sounds in the caves, resulting in eerie or weird echo effects. The blowing wind helps to mitigate the high humidity conditions.



and here is another

In nature, moon jellies spend most of their time drifting on currents rather that swimming. In captivity, they will require an aquarium with a well designed turbulence system to keep them from becoming a helpless ball of gelatinous goo at the bottom of your tank.



and finally

Kepler-22b is an extrasolar planet that circles Kepler-22, a G-type star that is situated about 600 light-years from our own planet in the constellation Cygnus. This intriguing new world, that resides beyond our Solar System, was first spotted by NASA's highly productive, though ill-fated, Kepler Space Telescope in 2011. Kepler-22b has the distinction of being the first known transiting extrasolar planet to reside within the so-called habitable zone of its star. The habitable zone is the term used to describe that Goldilocks region around a star where water can exist in its life-loving liquid state. Planets dwelling in this fortunate region are not too hot, not too cold, but just right for water and, hence, life to exist. A planet that circles its star in the habitable zone suggests that there is the possibility--though not the promise--of life as we know it to exist on that world.

Other facts:

The model indicates that Triton originated as part of a binary system, much like Pluto and its large moon Charon. "It's not so much that Charon orbits Pluto, but rather both move around their mutual center of mass, which lies between two objects," Agnor added.



Most of the moons of our Solar System are icy little desolate and dead worlds, dwelling in the dark, cold stillness of those regions far from the warmth and light of our Sun. However, a few of these small bodies may not be lifeless. For example, Europa of Jupiter may have a subsurface global ocean of liquid water secreted beneath its cracked, jumbled frozen crust of ice. This subsurface ocean might be warmed by tidal flexing into a hospitable, life-friendly liquid-water state, where primitive life-forms may swim around in the deep-sea darkness beneath Europa's ice. In addition, the second-largest moon in our Solar System, Titan of Saturn, possesses an environment that is eerily similar to that of our own planet long before life evolved out of the lifeless ooze (prebiotic). Big, lazy raindrops of liquid hydrocarbons float to the surface of this tormented, frigid moon, forming seas and lakes composed of methane and ethane that play the same role as water on Earth. It is entirely possible that life, as we do not know it, can evolve and flourish using liquids other than water. The largest moon of our Solar System, Ganymede of Jupiter, is larger than the innermost planet Mercury. Like its sister-moon Europa, Ganymede may hold secreted, beneath its surface crust of ice, a global ocean of liquid water. The little icy moon, Enceladus of Saturn, spews out geysers of water mixed with ammonia (which plays the role of antifreeze) from its so-called "tiger stripes". Therefore, Enceladus could also harbor life-loving water hidden beneath its icy surface.



Crida and Charnoz tested their new model to find out whether it could be applied to other planets in addition to Saturn. Their investigation has brought to light several valuable facts. This scenario for moon-birth from planet-rings succeeds in offering an explanation as to why the largest moons dwell farther away from their parent planet than the smaller moons. It further explains the gathering of moons close to the Roche limit--their birthplace--on the outermost fringes of the rings. This distribution is in agreement with what is seen in the Saturn-system. The same scenario can also apply to the moons of other giant planets, such as the ice-giants Uranus and Neptune. The Uranus-system and the Neptune-system are also organized in a similar way. This discovery suggests that long ago, when these planets were young, they also sported impressive rings like those of Saturn--which ultimately vanished when their moons were born. Finally, this scenario can also explain the formation of Earth's Moon, and the moons of the dwarf planet Pluto. According to Crida and Charnoz's calculations, under special circumstances a single moon--like Earth's own--can be born from a primordial ring around its planet. This may well have occurred in both the case of Earth's single large Moon, and for Pluto's largest moon, Charon.